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Get Flat Tire From Hitting A Curb, Let's Investigate!

Editor: J. Goreham | Updated: Tuesday, February 13th, 2024

Can you get a flat tire from hitting a curb? It's a real worry. When your car hits a curb, it can cause some tire troubles. These problems aren't just annoying—they're risky for how safe and well your ride works.

Can A Tire Go Flat From Hitting The Curb?

Can you get a flat tire from hitting a curb? Absolutely. When your tire smacks into a curb, it can lead to damage that might make your tire go flat. How bad the damage is depends on how hard the hit was, the angle, and how good your tire is[1]

There are a few ways hitting a curb can make your tire flat. One common reason is when something sharp, like a nail or glass, pokes a hole in the tire, making air come out.

Another problem is if the side of the tire gets hurt. That part is weaker, so a strong hit can cut or tear it, making the tire flat.

Also, a tough hit can mess up the wheel rim, making it bend or not sit right. That can mess up how well your tire works and might lead to a flat tire later.

Imagine trying to drive through narrow streets with cars parked close together or misjudging how far you are from the curb when turning. Situations like these can make your tire hit the curb, causing damage that might make your tire go flat later. Even a small bump against a curb while parking can cause trouble and maybe a flat tire later on.

How Bad is Hitting a Curb?

Understanding the effects of hitting a curb helps grasp why avoiding it is smart . [2] Here are the issues to keep in mind:

  • Tire Troubles: Hitting a curb can make your tire burst or lose air suddenly. It's risky, especially at high speeds, as it affects how you control your car. Fixing a blown-out tire on the road can be a hassle.
  • Rim Damage: Hitting a curb hard can harm your car's rims. They might bend or get dented, causing air leaks and flat tires. Bent rims can also mess up how your tires wear and handle.
  • Steering Issues: Hitting a curb can mess up your front wheels, causing steering problems like feeling off-center or pulling to one side. Fixing these issues might be pricey.
  • Bumpy Ride: The impact can mess up your car's suspension, making it bounce more. This makes the ride uncomfortable and might reduce how well your car sticks to the road.
  • Weird Noises: After hitting a curb, you might hear odd sounds like clunking or grinding. These could mean problems with your suspension or wheel alignment. Ignoring them might lead to costlier repairs later on.

What To Do After Hitting A Curb?

After a bump with a curb, here's what you should do:

  • Stay Safe: Move to the side, turn on hazard lights, and take a moment to check things out.
  • Look at Your Car: Walk around and check tires, rims, and under your car for any damage or loose parts.
  • Check Tire Pressure: Use a gauge to check all tires, including the spare. If any tire looks really flat, it's best not to drive on it.
  • Check Alignment: Even a small hit can mess up how your wheels steer. Watch for drifting or a wonky steering wheel.
  • Test Drive: Get back in and drive slowly to test the steering and handling in a safe area. Pay attention to pulling, vibrations, or unusual noises.

Can Hitting A Curb Damage A Wheel Bearing?

When your car hits a curb hard, it can hurt the wheel and its bearing. [3] While wheel bearings are strong during normal driving, a big hit can cause damage. This might make the wheel move or get out of place, putting pressure on the bearing.

You can tell if the wheel bearing is damaged. One sign is a grinding or humming noise from that wheel. This noise gets louder as you speed up.

Also, a damaged wheel bearing can make the steering wheel shake or vibrate, affecting how well you control the car.

If you think the wheel bearing got damaged from hitting a curb, get a mechanic to check it out.

Tips To Avoid Hitting Curbs

Following these tips will help you avoid hitting curbs while driving, keeping you and your car safe on the road. Make these habits a part of your routine.

  • Stay Aware: Always pay attention to what's around you while driving. Keep your eyes on the road and regularly check your mirrors, especially when you're turning or changing lanes, so you know where your car is in relation to the curbs.
  • Keep Distance: Make sure there's enough space between your car and the curb. This way, if something unexpected happens, or you need to make a quick move, you've got room. Try to stay at least a foot away from the curb to be safe.
  • Use Your Mirrors Well: Use your side mirrors properly to see how close you are to the curb. Adjust them right for a good view and help judge the distance between your car and the curb.
  • Slow Down for Turns: When you're approaching turns, especially tight ones, slow down a bit. This helps you control your car better and avoid scraping against the curbs.
  • Park Carefully: Take your time when parking. If you have tools like reverse cameras or parking sensors, use them. Go slowly and park parallel to the curb without touching it.
  • No Distractions: Avoid doing other stuff like using your phone or eating while driving. Staying focused on the road helps you control your car better and reduces the chance of hitting curbs.
  • Give Yourself Space: If you're driving in a place you're not familiar with or on narrow streets with parked cars, give yourself more space. This makes it easier to maneuver without hitting curbs in tight spots.
  • Check Tire Pressure: Keep an eye on your tire pressure regularly. Properly inflated tires help your car handle better and reduce the chance of hitting curbs.

What is the Best Way to Fix-a-Flat Tire?

Fixing a flat tire needs some steps involving a patch or plug method to make sure it's sealed up well. Here's what I do:

  • Take Off the Tire: Remove the tire from the wheel to check it properly.
  • Check It Out: Look at the hole and see how big it is. Also, check if anything inside got damaged.
  • Get Ready: If we can fix it, I clean it up and make it ready for the patch or plug.
  • Put Stuff On: I use special fluid on the hole and the cleaned part, then let it dry for a bit.
  • Put the Fix On: I use a repair thing to cover the hole and stitch it to the tire. I add some rubber stuff and trim off any extra bits.
  • Back On the Road: Blow it up, balance it, and put it back on the car.

It's better to let the experts handle flat tire fixes for safety and to make sure it lasts longer.

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